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May 30

Top 10 Things You Should Not Share on Social Networks-2

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5: Your Address and Phone Number

File this one under security risk. If you share your address and phone number on a social networking site, you open yourself up to threats of identity theft and other personal dangers like burglaries. If you post that you’re going on vacation and you have your address posted, then everyone knows you have an empty house. Identity thieves could pay a visit to your mailbox and open up a credit card in your name. Burglars could rid your home of anything of value. Even just posting your phone number gives people with Internet savvy easy access to your address. Reverse lookup services can supply anyone with your home address if you can provide the phone number.

4: Personal Finance Information

You would think that nobody would share things like where they do their banking or what their stock portfolio looks like, but it happens. Especially with all the headlines of banks going bankrupt and stock prices plummeting during the 2008/2009 recession, it’s easy for an innocent Facebook comment to reveal too much about your personal finances. Consider this scenario: You’re posting to a long thread on a friend’s wall about the bank crisis. You say something along the lines of, “We don’t need to worry because we bank with **** Bank,” or even, “We put all our money into blue chip stocks and plan to ride it out.” Again, if you’re one the 40 percent who allow open access to your profile, then suddenly identity thieves know where you bank and where you have the bulk of your investments. It’s easy to forget that what may seem like a harmless comment on a Facebook wall could reveal a great deal about your personal finances. It’s best to avoid that kind of talk altogether.

3: Your Password

This one really seems like a no-brainer, but if it didn’t happen, then Facebook probably wouldn’t feel the need to list it in the No. 1 slot on its list of things you shouldn’t share. Even sharing the password with a friend so he or she can log on and check something for you can be a risk. This is especially true with couples who feel like there’s enough trust to share these kinds of things. Here’s another scenario for you: You give your boyfriend your Facebook password because he wants to help you upload some vacation photos. A couple of months later, the relationship sours, he turns into a not-so-nice guy and then there’s a person out there who doesn’t like you and has your login information. Time to cancel your account and get a new one! If you’d have kept that information private to begin with, you could simply move on with your life. Now you have a compromised profile, and if you link to other sites or profiles, all that information is at risk as well. Keep your password to yourself, no matter what, and you never have to worry about it.

2: Password Hints

Most Web sites that contain secure personal information require a password also have at least one password hint in case you forget. It typically goes like this: You sign up for something like online banking and you get a login and password and then choose a security question for when you forget your password. What’s the name of your first pet? What’s your mother’s maiden name? What was your high school mascot? What’s the name of the first street you lived on? Including any of these details on a Facebook wall or status update may not seem like a big deal, but it could provide an identity thief with the last piece of the puzzle needed to hack into your bank account. Think before you post anything that could compromise this information.

1: Anything You Don’t Want Shared

You can select all the privacy settings you want on social networking sites, but the fact is, if you post it, it has the potential to be seen by someone you don’t want seeing it. You know all those fun Facebook applications, quizzes and polls you can’t help but fill out? A study performed by the University of Virginia found that of the top 150 applications on Facebook, 90 percent were given access to information they didn’t need in order for the app to function. So when you sign up to find out what sitcom star you most identify with, the makers of that poll now have access to your personal information. It’s anybody’s guess where it goes from there. Social networking is all about sharing, so something you think is in confidence can easily be shared and then shared again, and before you know it, someone you don’t even know has access to something private. “When in doubt, leave it out” is a good motto to follow. And always remember that anything you share has the potential to be leaked in some way.

Source: How stuff works

 

Top 10 Things You Should Not Share on Social Networks-1

 

 

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About the author

Njumoke Abiola-Oseni

Njumoke Abiola-Oseni is the Executive Director, Training and Business Intelligence at Trisat Communications Ltd. She holds a Bachelors Degree(B.Tech) in Computer Engineering with ICT Certifications such as Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA), Project Management, MikroTik Certified Network Associate (MTCNA), and Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL). She currently administers all Trisat training engagements and consults for SMBs on Business Intelligence such as Customer Relationship Management (CRM), Microsoft Small Business Server (SBS), Messaging Systems and Call Center Solutions and Customised Software Application. Njumoke Abiola-Oseni is a Co-Founder of Trisat Communications Ltd.